crop development News

  • Cement develops an appetite for C02

    Three new studies illuminate the sheer complexity of the aspect of climate science known as the carbon cycle − how carbon dioxide gets into the atmosphere and out again. Sometimes, human agency is at work, but nature takes care of it anyway – as one of the studies reveals in the case of cement, the world’s most widely-used building material. Zhu Liu, postdoctoral scholar at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Writing an equation for soil success

    Soil isn’t one size fits all. It may look the same under your feet – but under a microscope, that’s a different story. A plant’s roots, tiny bugs – these things can tell one soil from another quite easily. Soil scientists typically measure different aspects of soil — how much air it contains, how well it retains water, heat, and more — to ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Pedro Torres and Horticultorres Introduces New FibreDust Products in Mexico

    In the summer of 2015, Pedro Torres Plaza founded Horticultorres S. de R.L. de C.V., a new company active in the field providing horticultural supplies and consulting to the Mexican greenhouse industry. Before the start of Horticultorres, Torres, an entrepreneur, realized early on that horticulture was his passion. After graduating from ITESM, campus Queretaro as an Agronomist, ...


    By FibreDust LLC

  • John Deere 5G Series Tractors Receive Prestigious AE50 Award for 2016

    The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) awarded the John Deere 5G Series Tractors with an AE50 Award for 2016. The AE50 award highlights the year's most innovative designs in product engineering, as chosen by a panel of international engineering experts. Introduced to the specialty crop markets in December 2015, the narrow and highly maneuverable John Deere ...


    By John Deere

  • Motorizing Sudanese crop irrigation

    The parched landscape of Sudan, on the southern edge of the Sahara desert, is among the world's driest regions, with a nine-month dry season and a highly unreliable rainy season. Large-scale farmers there manage to grow about half of the impoverished nation's food production with the help of motorized irrigation pumps, but for individual subsistence farmers and their families--about two-thirds of ...

  • Growing crops in the city

    A case study published in the 2010 Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education by professors at Washington State University studies the challenges one organization faced in maintaining an urban market garden. The journal is published by the American Society of Agronomy. Since 1995, Seattle Youth Garden Works (SYGW) has employed young homeless individuals or those involved in the ...

  • Impacts of tillage on soil and crops

    The increasing popularity of reduced tillage on crops has not only been an important development in combating soil erosion, but it has also been associated with increasing organic material and producing high crop yields. For peanut crops, however, reduced tillage has not gained a large acceptance as a viable practice, as findings of inconsistent yields have not encouraged farmers to make a switch ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Saltwater solution to save crops

    Technology under development at the University of New South Wales could offer new hope to farmers in drought-affected and marginal areas by enabling crops to grow using salty groundwater. Associate Professor Greg Leslie, a chemical engineer at UNSW's UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology, is working with the University of Sydney on technology which uses reverse-osmosis membranes to ...

  • Farmers in 11 developing countries win UN-backed grants for conserving crops

    Nicaraguan farmers preserving ancient varieties of potatoes, and Kenyan women revitalizing differing types of millet are among projects in 11 developing countries to win supporting grants for their work, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) announced today. A total of more than $500,000 will go to farming projects in Egypt, Kenya, Costa Rica, India, Peru, Senegal, Uruguay, ...


    By United Nations

  • Crop Protection 2014 Update available through Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development

    One of the most widely requested publications available through Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development is the Crop Protection book, also known as the “Blue Book.” This publication is updated annually and provides the most recent information on registered pesticide products. Updates for the pesticide products included in the ...

  • Chipper and baler for energy crops

    Biothek, a company devoted to biomass research and production from Arundo k-12, and the chipping machine manufacturer Serrat from Aragon in Spain, have presented a chipping head that can be coupled to a baler for energy crops The chipping head replaces the traditional system for feeding balers or pick-up by attaining more compact, denser bales. In the first demonstration carried out on Arundo ...

  • Biodiesel Crop Market Update

    We profoundly declare that we are expected to receive the first signs of next harvest of our various High value Nonfood Oil Crop seeds as temperatures start to warm-up. However, crops are well behind the normal for this time of year –Hopefully the warmer weather will encourage plant growth but as times progress, yield potential, on what crop is growing, will come under increased scrutiny. ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • First quinoa crop harvested

    Wageningen UR researchers have developed three quinoa varieties suitable for cultivation in Europe. These new varieties were planted alongside each other on three Wageningen UR test fields last April. The earliest-ripening variety was harvested yesterday in Lelystad; the remaining two crops will be harvested from the other test fields in late August. The initial yields look quite promising. ...

  • Cereal Crops Feeling the Heat

    LIVERMORE, California (ENS) - Warming temperatures since 1981 have caused annual losses of about US$5 billion for six major cereal crops, new research has found. This is the first study to estimate how much global food production already has been affected by climate change. From 1981 to 2002, fields of wheat, corn and barley throughout the world have produced a combined 40 million ...

  • The future of cover crops

    Winter cover crops are an important component of nutrient cycling, soil cover and organic matter content. Although its benefits are well documented, cover crop use in farming systems is relatively low. Research has shown that time and money are the two primary reasons why farmers are hesitant to adopt the technique. Developing innovative and cost-effective crop cover systems could increase the ...

  • Cultivating crops on city rooftops

    To meet the challenges of producing food in a more environmentally-friendly way, the European Environment Agency (EEA) has called on cities to develop 'living walls' of edible plants. Through vertical farming, agriculture could become a feature of urban life, lowering energy consumption, carbon emissions and resource use in food production. By shortening the distance produce has to travel from ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • CSIRO and Bayer to focus on sustainable crops

    This collaboration will develop and apply models to assess the system-wide consequences of new-generation cereal crops in the face of global environmental and food security challenges. The project will assess the full environmental impact of the crops, including their influence on the carbon footprint of cereal production. This program will build on a long-term cereal research agreement between ...

  • Reality check for `miracle` biofuel crop

    The hardy jatropha tree as a biofuel source may not be the panacea for smallholders that some have claimed, say Miyuki Iiyama and James Onchieku. It sounds too good to be true: a biofuel crop that grows on semi-arid lands and degraded soils, replaces fossil fuels in developing countries and brings huge injections of cash to poor smallholders. That is what some are claiming for Jatropha curcas, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Biodiesel Crop of the Week: Pongamia Pinnata

    Pongamia is an ancient tree that is native to India. It is frost tolerant, but not freeze-proof. It is also happens to be a legume, which is at the heart of what makes the business model so interesting. The tree yields a generous annual nut crop that is harvested with conventional shakers, such as those used by almond and other nut growers. That seed has approximately a 40 percent oil content ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • Cover crops reduce erosion, runoff

    Cover crops may be more effective at reducing soil erosion and runoff after maize harvest than rough tillage, according to scientists from the Université Catholique de Louvain, in collaboration with the Independent Center for the Promotion of Forage (CIPF). The three-year study, supervised by Charles Bielders and conducted by Eric Laloy, measured erosion and runoff losses from silt loam ...

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