root crop News

  • Root-imaging technology could improve crop resilience

    Mexican researchers have welcomed a breakthrough in imaging plant roots, saying it could help breeders develop new varieties of crops that can thrive in harsh conditions. The technique uses X-ray computed tomography to build up a three-dimensional image by scanning through 360 degrees, a technology commonly used in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Getting to the root of plants

    A diverse team of researchers from Europe, Asia and the USA have unearthed new information on how roots grow and develop. Specifically, how roots are able to move out sideways out of the central root and into the soil. Their discovery has opened the way to further research that may eventually lead to the creation of new crops with improved root structure, improving their chances of survival in ...

  • Reinforcement of soil by plant roots

    Landslides have devastating impacts across the globe resulting in the loss of life and the destruction of billions of dollars in infrastructure. Soil erosion from wind and water threatens food production, pollutes the environment, and can make living in major cities such as Beijing almost unbearable during dust storms. Just like the great dust bowl of the 1930s, many instances of soil erosion and ...

  • Root strength in OSR and winter cereals

    We should never underestimate the importance of roots. Good plant roots are essential for water and nutrient uptake and as such have a significant influence on crop health and yield. Whatever the autumn weather, stimulating the development of deeper root systems will improve the plant’s ability to access the nutrients and water required for establishment and early growth. ...


    By Ilex EnviroSciences Limited

  • Saltwater solution to save crops

    Technology under development at the University of New South Wales could offer new hope to farmers in drought-affected and marginal areas by enabling crops to grow using salty groundwater. Associate Professor Greg Leslie, a chemical engineer at UNSW's UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology, is working with the University of Sydney on technology which uses reverse-osmosis membranes to ...

  • A worldwide network of seed information is taking root

    As an increasingly bloody civil war raged around them, a team of scientists in the Syrian capital Aleppo quietly packaged and shipped a series of nondescript cardboard boxes to an island not far from the North Pole. The boxes bore no sign of the conflict that had surrounded them or the precious material ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Climate-smart farming takes root in Kenya

    Like most African countries, Kenya is highly vulnerable to the impact of climate change. There is growing concern about potential stress on fragile ecosystems and rural communities, especially in the arid and semi-arid agro-ecological zones and some humid highland areas of the country. In keeping with the Strategy for Revitalizing Agriculture (SRA) of Kenya 2010-2015 and Kenya's vision 2030, ...

  • Global well-being: rooted in the world`s forests

    This piece originally appeared in the Washington Post Environmental Leadership supplement on April 20, 2011, and is reposted with permission. This year, 2011, has been declared the International Year of Forests, and while a few bright spots exist, forests today face a host of challenges. Mounting pressures from agricultural expansion, rapid economic development, and growing demand for products ...

  • Greening China - Canadian trees takes root in China

    Ontario's official tree, the Eastern White Pine, has found a new home in China. It's one of several several tree species that Canadian companies like Maple Leaf Reforestation (MLR) and the Sino-Forest Corporation (SFC) are producing in China as part of a massive reforestation effort. China said in its most recent five-year plan that it aims to add 31-million acres of forest by 2015. In 2005, ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Cover Crops Add to Farm Sustainability

    A potentially record-setting U.S. corn harvest is underway. Many farmers can attribute the use of cover crops as one of multiple best management practices (BMPs) that help them increase yield year after year. Combined with BMPs of The Fertilizer Institute’s 4R Nutrient Stewardship program that promotes the application of nutrients at the right source, right rate, right time and right place, ...

  • Drought in Haiti ravages crops for farmers

    Jean-Romain Beltinor plunged a hoe into the rocky dirt on his parched hillside to prepare for planting seeds he does not have. After months of drought in northwest Haiti, the subsistence farmer struggles to find food for his 13 children. To earn a little money, he must turn to work that only makes things worse, cutting what little wood remains for charcoal. "The rain isn't falling. I can't feed ...


    By Associated Press

  • Reality check for `miracle` biofuel crop

    The hardy jatropha tree as a biofuel source may not be the panacea for smallholders that some have claimed, say Miyuki Iiyama and James Onchieku. It sounds too good to be true: a biofuel crop that grows on semi-arid lands and degraded soils, replaces fossil fuels in developing countries and brings huge injections of cash to poor smallholders. That is what some are claiming for Jatropha curcas, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • UF/IFAS researchers use pigs to root out problem weeds

    Sometimes, the old-fashioned ways are the best ways. Back before chemical pesticides and herbicides, farmers had to come up with ways to kill the weeds that took over their fields. One method used “back in the day” was letting pigs loose in fields that were not being used for crops for a season and allowing the pigs to do what they do naturally: dig up the roots of weeds and ...

  • Combating pest insects in the soil with root-colonizing insecticidal fungi

    The biological control of pest insects in the soil has come one step closer. Wageningen UR has isolated five promising fungi that kill 90 to 100 per cent of the grubs and crane fly larvae, and which also survive well in the soil when there are no pest insects present. It is expected that these insecticidal fungi will also be effective against other pest insects in the soil. Surviving ...

  • Target the crop not the soil - to reduce fertiliser use

    Feed the crop not the soil’ is the message of a new review into sustainable phosphorus use. Currently, phosphorus fertiliser is applied to the soil, and plants then take it up through the roots. However, more precise nutrient management is needed on farms, the researchers say, so that the phosphorus is targeted at the crop just as it needs it. Modern agriculture is dependent on phosphorus, ...

  • “Biofortification” boosts nutrients in Africa’s staple crops

    Whether a bowl of rice or a piece of bread, staple foods provide millions of poor people around the world with a source of basic sustenance day in and day out. Now, a new technology promises to make these foods-which provide calories but do not always contain enough of the micronutrients required for good health-more nutritious. People who intake insufficient amounts of iron, zinc, and vitamin A ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Desert bacteria could help boost crop yields

    Desert soil microbes could help halt desertification and boost agriculture in arid regions of the Middle East and North Africa, according to a study.   Scientists from the United Arab Emirates [UAE] have isolated local salt- and drought-tolerant strains of Rhizobia, soil bacteria that fix nitrogen when they become established ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Squeezing more crop out of each drop of water

    Studies in China and Colorado by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators have revealed some interesting tactics on how to irrigate with limited water, based on a crop’s critical growth stages. Laj Ahuja, research leader at the ARS Agricultural Systems Research Unit in Fort Collins, Colo., and colleagues conducted the studies. As one example, with wheat in China, they found ...

  • Diversifying crops `could green African agriculture`

    The biodiversity of crop fields could be key to a greener revolution in Africa, where ecosystems are degrading and crop yields are stagnating, says a study conducted in Malawi. African farmers could halve their fertiliser use and still get the same yields, the study found, with less year-to-year variation in yields and with as much as 70 per cent more protein in grains — by simply rotating ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Uganda starts `historic` trials on GM staple crops

    Ugandan researchers will carry out a series of field trials on some of the major food crops that have been genetically modified (GM), following several recent approvals by the Uganda National Biosafety Committee, despite a lack of clear legislation on commercialising any such products within the country. They will seek to develop both transgenic and conventional maize varieties tolerant to ...


    By SciDev.Net

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you