forage moving Articles

  • Could forage maize feed value be slipping through your fingers?

    With harvest just around the corner, a new survey suggests that while maize is an important silage, not all farmers are doing everything possible to preserve its feed value. A massive 98% of farmers growing forage maize feel it is either extremely important (66% of respondents) or very important (32%) to maximise the amount of milk produced from forage, versus from bought-in feeds. Moreover, 84% ...


    By Ecosyl Products Limited

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Can drip irrigation keep the Prairie Profitable?

    The use of flood and center pivot irrigation of crops via the waters of the Ogallala Aquifer is as hot a discussion topic as the current drought. To many who mine the aquifer to make a living, trying to keep a profitable way of life sustainable in a time when the broader public is seeking more conservation of resources yet wanting inexpensive, plentiful and safe food is problematic. Perhaps it's ...


    By Netafim USA

  • Questions and Answers on Honey Bee Control

    Honey bees are valuable pollinators playing an important role in both native and agricultural crop production. Beekeepers keep bees in wooden manufactured hives, but the most common natural nest site for bees is a hollow tree or other cavity. Occasionally, honey bees may use a wall void or attic space in a house as a nesting site. In these situations, the decision to take action depends upon the ...


    By Master Bee Removal

  • Chicago Council lists three-decade changes in greenhouse gases and average temperature

    In 2011, we wrote a column, “Global warming is happening: How should farmers respond?” (http://agpolicy.org/weekcol/549.html). In that column we began by saying, “There was a time when one could legitimately argue that there was a lack of scientific agreement over the issue of the role of humans in global warming and even whether we were in a ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Earth out of sync rising temperatures throwing off seasonal timing

    A newly hatched chick waits with hungry mouth agape for a parent to deliver its first meal. A crocus peaks up through the snow. Rivers flow swiftly as ice breaks up and snows melt. Sleepy mammals emerge from hibernation, and early frog songs penetrate the night. Spring awakening has long provided fodder for poets, artists, and almanac writers. Even for a notoriously fickle time of sunshine, ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Top trends conservationists should be paying attention to — but aren’t

    Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. ...


    By Ensia

  • The newest strategy for saving bees is really, really old

    With pollinators in decline around the world, conservationists turn to traditional farmers for answers. In northwestern India, the Himalaya Mountains rise sharply out of pine and cedar forests. The foothills of the Kullu Valley are blanketed with apple trees beginning to bloom. It’s a cool spring morning, and Lihat Ram, a farmer in Nashala village, shows me a ...


    By Ensia

  • Rake In Greater Capacity And Higher Hay Quality

    It’s been said that the steel-toothed dump rake was first introduced in the 1860s. Of course, the process back then was to rake hay into piles, which were then pitched onto a wagon for transport to a haystack or the barn loft. To make windrows for the balers that came later, the operator simply spaced the “dumps” equally so they lined up in the field. The irony is that until ...


    By Vermeer

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

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