livestock operation emissions Articles

  • Managing livestock diets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions - Case study

    Scientists in South East Asia have been measuring greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from goats and cattle in a series of research projects investigating the effects of different feeding regimes. In each case, the eructed, or belched, emissions from each animal were ...


    By Gasmet Technologies Oy

  • Evaluation of an operational method for the estimation of emissions of nitrogen compounds for a group of farms

    The aim of this article is to evaluate a practical method for estimating nitrogen emissions on the scale of a group of farms, to be used in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The method rests on the estimation of nitrogen inputs and outputs to calculate the surplus of the annual nitrogen balance on the scale of a farm. The different gaseous nitrogen losses (NH3, NO, N2O, ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Evaluation of greenhouse gas emissions and design of mitigation options: a whole farm approach based on farm management data and mechanistic models

    Agricultural activities are important sources of nitrous oxide (N22O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). They contribute approximately 10% of the total emitted greenhouse gases (GhG) in the European Union. We search for evaluating GhG emissions at the farm level and designing mitigation options. As emissions occur at many stages within the farm operation, it is crucial to ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Filter manure slurries directly before, after, or in place of anearobic digesters with a reverse osmosis VSEP membrane system, providing potable water for the animals and a concentrated nutrient feedstock for fertilizer.

    If constructed and managed properly, the age-old lagoon method of manure handling is a reliable method of storing and treating livestock waste. Lagoon storage followed by sprayfield application on local farms has proven to be a very symbiotic and effective method throughout the ages. However, the recent trend in the hog production and the cattle industry is towards larger centralized operations ...


    By New Logic Research, Inc.

  • An odor predictive model for rendering applications

    Abstract The rendering process consists of crushing and heating animal remains to produce by-products. The U.S. produces approximately 30 billion pounds of inedible animal by-products annually, exporting a market value of US$ 1.5 billion. Benefits of the rendering process include reducing total waste material, and helping the livestock industry stay competitive over ...


    By Biorem Technologies Inc.

  • Food, the carbon story

    What do milk, bread and orange juice have in common? One answer is that they have all had their carbon footprints assessed and the products have been labelled by the Carbon Trust. Over the last five years, the Carbon Trust has certified the carbon footprints of a wide range of food products, and worked with a variety of companies to help them understand the carbon content of their food. As a ...


    By Carbon Trust

  • Unlocking the potential of poultry manure

    The poultry industry is one of the largest and fastest-growing agro-based industries in the world. At the same time, the growth brings along a number of environmental problems. One of the major environmental problems is the accumulation of large amounts of wastes, e.g. manure. In order to mitigate these problems new economically sustainable technologies are needed. Manure has often been ...


    By Ductor Corp.

  • Towards climate-responsible peatlands management

    Peatlands are lands with a naturally accumulated peat layer at their surface. They are found all over the world and come in many forms, display many different characteristics and are used in many different ways. Even though peatlands extend over a relatively small portion of the earth’s land surface, they hold a large pool of carbon. There is no universal definition of peatlands. For the ...


    By Wetlands International

  • The localization of agriculture

    In the United States, there has been a surge of interest in eating fresh local foods, corresponding with mounting concerns about the climate effects of consuming food from distant places and about the obesity and other health problems associated with junk food diets. This is reflected in the rise in urban gardening, school gardening, and farmers’ markets. With the fast-growing local foods ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Anaerobic Digest

    Boulder, Colorado: U.S. Distributed Renewables Forecast Published Navigant Research, a market research and consulting firm in Boulder, recently published the “U.S. Distributed Renewables Deployment Forecast, 2016-2025.” The report notes that deployment of distributed renewables, such as wind, solar and anaerobic digestion facilities, in the U.S. has accelerated in the last ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Financing an anaerobic digester

    LENDERS are generally well disposed to projects that diversify revenues while lowering costs and mitigating risks. Add a ready source of equity and you are well on the way toward financing a project that is a win-win proposition for the lender and the project developer. Such is the case with the anaerobic digester project at Geerlings Hillside Farm (GHF). The Geerlings's 8,000-head hog farm is ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Dutch Farmers Find It Pays To Manage Poultry Manure

    Poultry farmers in Holland face challenges similar to their North American counterparts in dealing with manure from concentrated operations where there is insufficient cropland for application. This creates a need for exporting manure from the producing farm to users in other places. Poultry operations in Holland differ from most North American poultry farms in that most are not vertically ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Agricultural Residuals Drive Producer-Owned Energy

    Farmer-owned renewable energy enterprises are increasing rapidly — with alternative fuels such as biodiesel, ethanol and distiller’s grains becoming mainstream. MINNESOTA is home to 16 ethanol plants generating approximately 550 million gallons per year. Most of these new facilities are producer-owned. Many others are under construction or are in the planning process. In 2005, Minnesota farmers ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Roundup - March 2018

    Sacramento, California: Alternative Manure Management Project Grants The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) awarded $9.64 million in grant funding to 17 alternative manure management projects across the state. These projects, part of the Alternative Manure Management Program, or AMMP, will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on California dairy farms and livestock ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Las Vegas DirtWorkz, Inc.: Using the City’s wood waste to farm the desert

    Ray Becerra knows a thing or two about recycling, reusing and repurposing waste materials. You might even say it’s in his blood. Becerra has spent his entire life around landfills and farming operations, and he wears his passion for recycling waste materials on his sleeve. His enthusiasm for dust, dirt and debris, says Becerra, comes from his father, an avid recycler who was involved in the ...

  • Going green in 2012: 12 steps for the developing world

    Many of us are thinking about the changes we want to make this year. For some, these changes will be financial; for others, physical or spiritual. But for all of us, there are important resolutions we can make to “green” our lives. Although this is often a subject focused on by industrialized nations, people in developing countries can also take important steps to reduce their growing ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • The Nature of the New World

    We recently entered a new century, but we are also entering a new world, one where the collisions between our demands and the earth’s capacity to satisfy them are becoming daily events. It may be another crop-withering heat wave, another village abandoned because of invading sand dunes, or another aquifer pumped dry. If we do not act quickly to reverse the trends, these seemingly isolated events ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

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