Termite Detection Systems Inc.

a graduate assistant and doctoral entomology student at the University of Florida in Gainesville,

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Courtesy of Termite Detection Systems Inc.

Cynthia Tucker, a graduate assistant and doctoral entomology student at the University of Florida in Gainesville, recently completed testing on the patented Termite Detection System (TDS), which samples the air in the wall cavities of buildings and analyzes its composition to determine any increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) that indicates termite activity. The yearlong laboratory experiments consisted of six termite infestations of varying degrees, along with two control units (featuring soil, water and wood, but no termites). Tucker reports that all six units showed at least a 2 percent increase in C02, with an average increase of nearly 3.5 percent. One unit showed a 5 percent increase. Meanwhile, the two control units showed 1 percent and .6 percent respectively, attributed to fungal bloom. Tucker notes that the test supports the theory of large increases in C02 levels where termites are present. She also tested the C02 levels with cockroaches and carpenter ants with negligible results.

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